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A Guide to Credit Score Scale

“Where you fall on the credit score scale is important. Let this guide help you. Check it out now!”

All About Credit Score Scale

Our financial lives are dictated with terms such as credit score, credit ratings, credit history and so on. These are the terms which often crop up when you are applying for loans or credit cards. No money lender or a finance institution approves a loan without reviewing the applicant’s credit scores and credit history. Although, most people have a vague idea regarding what are credit scores, most of them are unaware about the credit score scale.

Credit Score Scale Guide
Credit score is a statistical technique of determining the probability of an individual repaying his debt within a specific period of time, by evaluating and analyzing his previous credit history. In short, it is your creditworthiness represented by a number. The evaluation and analyzing work is done by three credit bureaus namely, TransUnion, Experian and Equifax. These bureaus have their own parameters and mathematical formulas for deriving a person’s credit score. The software program that uses the mathematical formulas to find credit score is devised by Fair Isaac Corporation (FICO), hence the score is also called FICO score. The scores derived by each of these bureaus may vary slightly, owing to the differences in the information in their databases.

Typically, following parameters are taken into consideration while deriving a person’s credit score. A fixed weightage is assigned to each of these parameters, which is as follows:
Payment history (35%)
Outstanding current debts (30%)
Length of credit history (15%)
Types of credit accounts owned (10%)
New credit applications (10%)
Credit Score Scale Chart

The FICO scores are expressed in a numerical range of 300 to 850.

Excellent
The credit scores between 760 to 849 are considered as least risky with a very high creditworthiness. The credit score of 850, which is an ideal credit score is the highest score possible in this range. People with excellent credit scores are entitled to fastest approvals and enjoy lowest possible interest rates.

Great
The next best category is ‘great’ with credit scores in the range of 700 to 759. People in this credit score range also enjoy almost all the privileges as those with excellent ratings.

Good
Good credit score range is a category in which most Americans falls. Credit score range of 660 to 699 is not a problem while seeking loan approvals. However, you may not get the best possible interest rates, enjoyed by the above two classes.

Fair
Credit score range of 620 to 659 is considered as low to medium risk. Although getting loans may not be an issue, getting them at affordable interest rates certainly is. People with fair or average credit scores should look for ways to improve credit scores so that they too can enjoy good interest rates.

Poor
You may have to run from pillar to post to obtain a loan, as money lenders regard poor or bad credit scores as high risk. Even if you manage to obtain a loan, you will have a tough time keeping up with the payments, owing to very high interest rates.

Very Poor
People who have very poor credit scores below 580 should consider credit repair before they approach a loan institution. Consistent efforts towards credit improvement may eventually help you attain a better credit score range. More at Credit Score Scale Guide

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Credit Score Range: Understanding the Different Credit Score Ranges

“Want to know more about credit score range and wondering what the different credit score ranges are? Let us help. Read more now!”

Different Credit Score Ranges

Your credit score is important. Very important. That three-digit figure is so influential that it determines your eligibility for credit cards, home and auto loans, student loans, apartment rentals and even some jobs. It’s vital to know your credit score range so you can decide which loans to apply for, know when you’re settling for less than you could get and, if necessary, take steps to rehabilitate your FICO score. Your credit score gives lenders an idea of whether they can rely on you to pay back your debts. It follows that your credit history, past and present, is among the data that credit bureaus use to calculate your score. If you’d like to get a grip on your score’s implications, read on: the nerds will clarify the finer points.

Lower score, higher interest
More than determining your eligibility for a loan, your score affects the cost to you, too. In fact, the score and the interest you pay are inversely proportional, roughly at a one-to-one ratio. So, as you boost your score, your monthly payments will generally decrease at the same rate. Let’s say you want to get some new wheels. To finance your slick new ride, you take out a 60-month fixed-rate auto loan of $15,000. If your score is in the gutter, say a 610, you’d pay $357 a month, according to myFICO.com. The guy next to you in the lot, with the Ray Bans on, has a superb score of 800. His score is about 30% better than yours—31.15% better, to be precise—as his monthly payment, at just $277, a 28.88% markdown. It’s clear that you’d rather be that other guy, who pays on time and keeps his debts low. Because once you start digging yourself a hole with late payments, it becomes harder to climb out, with the high rates weighing you down.

Understand your FICO score
The breakdown of credit score ranges is as follows:

630: Bad credit
You likely landed her because of bankruptcy, or because you’ve missed payments consistently—or, as is often the case with younger folks, you have no credit history at all. You’ll face higher interest rates and fees, and your choice of credit card is restricted. If you find yourself in this bracket and still want a credit card, a secured card is likely your best bet.

630-689: Fair (average) credit
Your score is average, and it’s probably because you have too much “bad” debt. If you’re holding onto some credit card debt or if your balance often grazes your credit limit, bureaus won’t trust you, and therefore lenders won’t either.

690-719: Good credit
Your rates are low, and you can choose from most cards, including those that earn rewards.

720-850: Excellent
If you’re in this bracket, take a look at cards with great fringe benefits. American Express, for example, offers premium cards that better accommodate the ritzy life.

Although these four categories are the standard, credit scores are still somewhat fluid, especially since the recession began. Since 2007, scores’ effect on consumers has become more severe, too, according to Paul Oster, the CEO of Better Qualified, LLC, which specializes in business and consumer credit services. “The impact of scores has changed dramatically,” Oster wrote in an e-mail. “Consumer’s credit scores can cost or save them hundreds of dollars a month. The ‘magic number’ has been increasing since the ‘R’ [the recession]. I know that 5 years ago 620 was a good benchmark, then it went to 640, 680, 720, and now 740. The average credit score is around a 685. Remember that scores are fluid and changing all the time. Studies show that individuals with an average credit score would reduce card finance charges by $76 annually if they raised their score by 30 points.” More at What are the Different Credit Score Ranges? Bad to Excellent and Everything In Between

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Debt Relief Solutions: 6 Ways to Get Out

“Looking for debt relief solutions? There are six main forms of debt relief solutions and choosing the right debt relief solution can be one of the most important financial decisions of your life. Read what these solutions are below…”

There are tons of debt relief solutions

There are tons of debt relief solutions

Each of the six choices offers positives and negatives, and no one choice is right for everyone in every situation. Debt relief is a broad term that defines many different types of debt relief solutions, including struggling to pay your loans, credit counseling, debt settlement or debt resolution programs, mortgage refinance loans, and two types of bankruptcy.

Debt relief can be a hard pill to swallow.

 

First, let us take a brief look at each choice. Later, we make a side-by-side comparison of each option, including the short- and long-term cost of each. Finally, we show you where to learn more about each option, and next steps you can take.

1. Minimum Payments

Making the minimum monthly payments on your credit cards can be a dangerous financial strategy. Although it may feel good to push a growing problem off to another month, if you have high interest rates and a credit card debt balance that has grown to become a problem it just might be time for a gut check and to look in the mirror.

We recommend consumers pay off their debts in full each and every month, especially credit card and high interest revolving debt. If you cannot manage to do that, make sure that you are aware of the true lifetime cost of that debt and what all of your debt payoff options are, and do not just blindly keep on the treadmill of making minimum payments.

2. Credit Counseling

Credit counseling is a program that enrolls you on a debt management plan (DMP), which usually allows you to qualify for concession rates from your creditors. The primary benefits of a credit counseling program are lower interest rates and lower payments.

Credit counseling, or signing up for a debt management plan, is a very common form of debt consolidation which is essentially a way to make one payment directly to the credit counseling agency that then distributes that payment to your creditors. Most times, a credit counseling agency will be able to lower your monthly payments by getting interest rate concessions from your lenders or creditors. Credit counseling is like aspirin for a mildly sick patient, where a little help and medicine solves a real pain or financial problem.

It is important to understand that in a credit counseling program, you are still repaying 100% of your debts — but with lower monthly payments. On average, most credit counseling programs take around five years. While most credit counseling programs do not impact your FICO score, being enrolled in a credit counseling debt management plan does show up on your credit report, and, unfortunately, many lenders look at enrollment in credit counseling akin to filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy — or using a third-party to re-organize your debts. You can learn more about this debt relief solution at the Bills.com section devoted to credit counseling.

3. Debt Settlement

Debt settlement services offer to negotiate and settle your debts for less than you owe, many times reducing debts by as much as half, before provider fees. Debt settlement is an option for people who cannot afford their monthly payments, and who are not worried if their credit rating will be negatively impacted during the program. It is important to be aware that you are not making monthly payments and staying current on your debts while enrolled in a debt settlement program, so be aware of the credit impact and the potential collection harassment from your creditors. Debt settlement is also a very aggressive form of debt consolidation, and it is akin to chemotherapy for a seriously ill patient — it will hurt but will hopefully kill the cancer and get you financially stable and healthy again quickly.

Unlike other forms of debt consolidation, debt settlement is based on the future resolution of your accounts, which means that results vary significantly and it is very important to work with a qualified and accredited provider.

4. Mortgage Refinance

You may be able to consolidate your debts with a home equity loan, mortgage refinance or other debt consolidation loans. If you are confident that you will to make the payments without building more credit card debt, debt consolidation refinance loans can be an excellent path to reducing your payments, lowering the total cost of your debts, and a refinance mortgage loan can also possibly reduce your taxes. You must be a homeowner to qualify for a mortgage refinance loan, and usually have excellent credit and significant equity accumulated in your home. You can learn more at the Bills.com refinance portal or even apply with Bills.com’s approved lenders.

5. and 6. Chapter 7 and Chapter 13

Bankruptcy should be your last choice in a debt relief solution because it will damage your credit for 7 to 10 years and, depending on which type of bankruptcy you file, you could be forced to give up some of your assets or assigned a long-term payment plan. There have also been legal changes put in place by Congress that make it more challenging to qualify for achapter 7 bankruptcy, forcing many people to file for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy which is really a repayment plan….. More at Debt Relief SolutionsSolutions on How to Find Effective Debt Relief Partners

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