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What is My Credit Score: FICO® Score Estimator

“Wondering what your credit score is? Let the FICO Score Estimator help. Check it out below now!”

The Question

How FICO Scores Work
When you apply for credit – whether for a credit card, a car loan, or a mortgage – lenders want to know what risk they’d take by loaning money to you.

FICO scores are the credit scores most lenders use to determine your credit risk. You have three FICO scores, one for each of the three credit bureaus – Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. Each score is based on information the credit bureau keeps on file about you. As this information changes, your credit scores tend to change as well.

Your 3 FICO scores affect both how much and what loan terms (interest rate, etc.) lenders will offer you at any given time.

Taking steps to get your FICO scores in the higher ranges can help you qualify for better rates from lenders.

Higher FICO Scores = Lower Payments
The higher your FICO® scores, the less you pay to buy on credit – no matter whether you’re getting a home loan, cell phone, a car loan, or signing up for credit cards.

You can roughly estimate your actual credit score with this free score estimator from FICO®, the most trusted name in credit scoring. Here’s how it works: Answer these ten easy questions and we’ll give you a free estimated range for your three FICO® scores.

What do you mean I might not have a score?
You won’t have a credit score unless you’re older than 18 and you’ve had a credit card in your own name for longer than six months. So, if you’re young or you pay with cash, you likely don’t have a score. Or, if you’re young and have only had a single credit card for a short period of time, you may not have a score yet either. So go ahead and answer the questions and get an idea. It’s free, it’s easy, and you don’t have to give up any personal information.

1. How many credit cards do you have?
I have never had a credit card
1
2 to 4
5 or more

2. How long ago did you get your first loan?
(i.e., auto loan, mortgage, student loan, etc.)
I have never had a loan
less than 6 months ago
between 6 months and 2 years ago
2 to 5 years ago
5 to 10 years ago
10 to 15 years ago
15 to 20 years ago
more than 20 years ago
More at FICO® Score Estimator

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What is a Credit Bureau

“What is a Credit Bureau? Most of us are still wondering what it does and why it’s important. Let this article help. Read more now!”

Credit Bureau Definition

Credit Bureau

A credit bureau is an organization that tracks the credit histories and related information of individuals. Whenever someone applies for credit, housing, employment, or anything else that their credit history could have an impact on, their potential creditor, landlord, or employer can check the information on file. If the bureau shows less-than-satisfactory information in its report on the person, it may affect the person’s chances of receiving the credit, lease, or job. A poor credit report can also result in higher interest rates on a loan or credit card.

There are three major US credit reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. Although the three companies share information, each maintains its own report and credit score on each individual. When someone applies for a line of credit, housing, or employment, the creditor or employer may look at the report and score from all three. For this reason, if an individual is monitoring his or her credit report for fraud or false information, it is a good idea to request a copy of the report from each agency.

A credit bureau gets the information for their reports from the individuals’ creditors. For example, if someone has a line of credit with his bank, that bank will report information regularly to the credit agency — good or bad. If the individual is always on time with payments, that fact will show on the credit report; however, if the individual has been more than 30 days late on one or more payments, the report is sure to reveal that, as well.

A variety of information gets reported to each agency. They all have personal information for each person who has gotten credit or opened a bank account on file, including their name, date of birth, Social Security number, current and previous addresses, and employment history. All of this information is collected by tracking people via creditor reports and Social Security numbers.

Account information is listed on the report, including the business handling the account, the date the account was opened, the credit line limit, the current balance, and the payment history. Even if an individual closes an account or the account becomes inactive, the report will still show this information for seven to 11 years. The accounts that each bureau includes on a credit report can be anything that is credit related, such as checking and savings accounts, credit cards, loans, and leases.

Each agency also reports any inquiries made into a person’s credit report. The report will show the type of inquiry and who made it. If too many inquiries are made within a certain period of time, the person’s credit rating can be negatively affected.

A credit bureau also includes public records on an individual’s credit report, if they are deemed related to a person’s credit worthiness. For example, if a person has declared bankruptcy, he or she will not be considered reliable, and companies may be hesitant to give him or her a line of credit. Bankruptcies are included on credit reports as a result. Even unpaid child support is considered to pertain to an individual’s dependability. This sort of information typically remains on a credit report for seven years. More at What is a Credit Bureau?

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A Guide to Credit Score Scale

“Where you fall on the credit score scale is important. Let this guide help you. Check it out now!”

All About Credit Score Scale

Our financial lives are dictated with terms such as credit score, credit ratings, credit history and so on. These are the terms which often crop up when you are applying for loans or credit cards. No money lender or a finance institution approves a loan without reviewing the applicant’s credit scores and credit history. Although, most people have a vague idea regarding what are credit scores, most of them are unaware about the credit score scale.

Credit Score Scale Guide
Credit score is a statistical technique of determining the probability of an individual repaying his debt within a specific period of time, by evaluating and analyzing his previous credit history. In short, it is your creditworthiness represented by a number. The evaluation and analyzing work is done by three credit bureaus namely, TransUnion, Experian and Equifax. These bureaus have their own parameters and mathematical formulas for deriving a person’s credit score. The software program that uses the mathematical formulas to find credit score is devised by Fair Isaac Corporation (FICO), hence the score is also called FICO score. The scores derived by each of these bureaus may vary slightly, owing to the differences in the information in their databases.

Typically, following parameters are taken into consideration while deriving a person’s credit score. A fixed weightage is assigned to each of these parameters, which is as follows:
Payment history (35%)
Outstanding current debts (30%)
Length of credit history (15%)
Types of credit accounts owned (10%)
New credit applications (10%)
Credit Score Scale Chart

The FICO scores are expressed in a numerical range of 300 to 850.

Excellent
The credit scores between 760 to 849 are considered as least risky with a very high creditworthiness. The credit score of 850, which is an ideal credit score is the highest score possible in this range. People with excellent credit scores are entitled to fastest approvals and enjoy lowest possible interest rates.

Great
The next best category is ‘great’ with credit scores in the range of 700 to 759. People in this credit score range also enjoy almost all the privileges as those with excellent ratings.

Good
Good credit score range is a category in which most Americans falls. Credit score range of 660 to 699 is not a problem while seeking loan approvals. However, you may not get the best possible interest rates, enjoyed by the above two classes.

Fair
Credit score range of 620 to 659 is considered as low to medium risk. Although getting loans may not be an issue, getting them at affordable interest rates certainly is. People with fair or average credit scores should look for ways to improve credit scores so that they too can enjoy good interest rates.

Poor
You may have to run from pillar to post to obtain a loan, as money lenders regard poor or bad credit scores as high risk. Even if you manage to obtain a loan, you will have a tough time keeping up with the payments, owing to very high interest rates.

Very Poor
People who have very poor credit scores below 580 should consider credit repair before they approach a loan institution. Consistent efforts towards credit improvement may eventually help you attain a better credit score range. More at Credit Score Scale Guide

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