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Credit Services: Experian

“There are lots of credit services out there. In this article, Experian explains what sets them out from the rest. Read it now!”

Top Credit Services

Credit Services provides information to organisations to help them manage the risks associated with extending credit to their customers and preventing fraud.

Experian has developed core expertise in building and managing very large and comprehensive databases containing the credit applications and repayment histories of consumers and businesses.

Consumer information
Experian operates 19 consumer credit bureaux, maintaining information on close to 800 million consumers. Our goal as a consumer credit reporting agency is to help lenders make better informed and faster credit decisions through access to detailed historical information about how consumers have fulfilled their credit obligations.

Experian’s clients are drawn from a wide range of industry sectors, where organisations routinely extending or offering credit to their customers, such as financial services, telecommunications, utilities, retail and insurance.

Our credit reports vary by country, but typically include identity data, transactional data, past and present credit obligations, court judgments, bankruptcy information, suspected fraudulent applications, collections data and previous addresses.

In the more developed credit markets, such as the US and UK, a credit report includes both positive and negative information. Positive data includes accounts that have been paid on time, forming a complete view of a consumer’s financial behaviours, while negative data includes past-due payments, collections accounts and public record information such as bankruptcies. In emerging credit markets, consumer credit reports often contain only negative data.

Experian does not make lending decisions or offer any comment or advice on particular applications, but simply provides factual information. This information is used by lenders throughout the customer life cycle:

Prospecting and origination
At the prospecting stage, where regulations permit, credit reports are used to identify consumers for pre-approved offers of credit.

At the application stage, credit reference checks are undertaken to verify the applicant’s identity, to assess credit risk and the potential for fraud, and to set the terms and conditions of the credit offer.

Account management and collections
Changes in a consumer credit report often indicate change in the risk or opportunity presented by existing customers, helping lenders to drive account management and retention programmes.

Experian’s credit reports also help improve the return on collections processes by optimising collection efforts, locating debtors and confirming and updating contact details. More at Credit Services

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Disputing Credit Report

“Sometimes, it’s not easy disputing a credit report. Read these tips, as they are sure to help. Check them out now!”

Ways on Disputing Credit Report

Checking the accuracy of your credit report is important, given recent reports that 5 percent of consumers may have errors in their reports that can result in higher interest rates on a loan.

The National Foundation for Credit Counseling has developed a list of “do’s” and “don’ts” for managing your report, which tracks your individual borrowing history. The major credit bureaus — Experian, TransUnion and Equifax — use information in the reports to create a credit score, which lenders use to decide if you are a good candidate for a loan and what interest rate you qualify for. Scores can also be used to determine eligibility for other financial products, like insurance.

Here’s the foundation’s list:

Review your report for accuracy at AnnualCreditReport.com. You’re entitled by law to one free report from each of the three major bureaus every 12 months, so you can check a different one every four months. Despite the availability of free reports, few consumers check them, the foundation says. Reviewing your report at least three months before a major financial move gives you time to dispute any errors and have them corrected.

Understand your rights. The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act provides protections for the accuracy and privacy of information in your credit file. The credit bureaus have dispute resolution processes in place. But it is up to the consumer to initiate the process by submitting the dispute form, either online or by phone.

Tara Siegel Bernard, writing for The Times, found that it’s better to submit a dispute in writing, to create a paper trail in case you need it later and to submit disputes to all three bureaus.

Credit reporting companies are required to investigate the items in question, usually within 30 to 45 days of the dispute being filed. The bureau receiving the dispute must forward all relevant information to the source of the information to begin the investigation process. After the provider’s investigation is complete, the results are sent back to the bureau. If the information provider finds the disputed information to be inaccurate, it must notify all three credit reporting companies, allowing each of them to correct the information in their files.

Not all errors have an equal impact. Some mistakes are more serious because they may have a negative impact on your credit score, like accounts that don’t belong to you, or credit lines listed with lower limits than they actually have or negative information that has stayed on the report longer than allowed. Those sorts of errors should be addressed immediately. More at Tips for Disputing Credit Report Errors

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What is a Credit Bureau

“What is a Credit Bureau? Most of us are still wondering what it does and why it’s important. Let this article help. Read more now!”

Credit Bureau Definition

Credit Bureau

A credit bureau is an organization that tracks the credit histories and related information of individuals. Whenever someone applies for credit, housing, employment, or anything else that their credit history could have an impact on, their potential creditor, landlord, or employer can check the information on file. If the bureau shows less-than-satisfactory information in its report on the person, it may affect the person’s chances of receiving the credit, lease, or job. A poor credit report can also result in higher interest rates on a loan or credit card.

There are three major US credit reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. Although the three companies share information, each maintains its own report and credit score on each individual. When someone applies for a line of credit, housing, or employment, the creditor or employer may look at the report and score from all three. For this reason, if an individual is monitoring his or her credit report for fraud or false information, it is a good idea to request a copy of the report from each agency.

A credit bureau gets the information for their reports from the individuals’ creditors. For example, if someone has a line of credit with his bank, that bank will report information regularly to the credit agency — good or bad. If the individual is always on time with payments, that fact will show on the credit report; however, if the individual has been more than 30 days late on one or more payments, the report is sure to reveal that, as well.

A variety of information gets reported to each agency. They all have personal information for each person who has gotten credit or opened a bank account on file, including their name, date of birth, Social Security number, current and previous addresses, and employment history. All of this information is collected by tracking people via creditor reports and Social Security numbers.

Account information is listed on the report, including the business handling the account, the date the account was opened, the credit line limit, the current balance, and the payment history. Even if an individual closes an account or the account becomes inactive, the report will still show this information for seven to 11 years. The accounts that each bureau includes on a credit report can be anything that is credit related, such as checking and savings accounts, credit cards, loans, and leases.

Each agency also reports any inquiries made into a person’s credit report. The report will show the type of inquiry and who made it. If too many inquiries are made within a certain period of time, the person’s credit rating can be negatively affected.

A credit bureau also includes public records on an individual’s credit report, if they are deemed related to a person’s credit worthiness. For example, if a person has declared bankruptcy, he or she will not be considered reliable, and companies may be hesitant to give him or her a line of credit. Bankruptcies are included on credit reports as a result. Even unpaid child support is considered to pertain to an individual’s dependability. This sort of information typically remains on a credit report for seven years. More at What is a Credit Bureau?

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