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Disputing Credit Report

“Sometimes, it’s not easy disputing a credit report. Read these tips, as they are sure to help. Check them out now!”

Ways on Disputing Credit Report

Checking the accuracy of your credit report is important, given recent reports that 5 percent of consumers may have errors in their reports that can result in higher interest rates on a loan.

The National Foundation for Credit Counseling has developed a list of “do’s” and “don’ts” for managing your report, which tracks your individual borrowing history. The major credit bureaus — Experian, TransUnion and Equifax — use information in the reports to create a credit score, which lenders use to decide if you are a good candidate for a loan and what interest rate you qualify for. Scores can also be used to determine eligibility for other financial products, like insurance.

Here’s the foundation’s list:

Review your report for accuracy at AnnualCreditReport.com. You’re entitled by law to one free report from each of the three major bureaus every 12 months, so you can check a different one every four months. Despite the availability of free reports, few consumers check them, the foundation says. Reviewing your report at least three months before a major financial move gives you time to dispute any errors and have them corrected.

Understand your rights. The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act provides protections for the accuracy and privacy of information in your credit file. The credit bureaus have dispute resolution processes in place. But it is up to the consumer to initiate the process by submitting the dispute form, either online or by phone.

Tara Siegel Bernard, writing for The Times, found that it’s better to submit a dispute in writing, to create a paper trail in case you need it later and to submit disputes to all three bureaus.

Credit reporting companies are required to investigate the items in question, usually within 30 to 45 days of the dispute being filed. The bureau receiving the dispute must forward all relevant information to the source of the information to begin the investigation process. After the provider’s investigation is complete, the results are sent back to the bureau. If the information provider finds the disputed information to be inaccurate, it must notify all three credit reporting companies, allowing each of them to correct the information in their files.

Not all errors have an equal impact. Some mistakes are more serious because they may have a negative impact on your credit score, like accounts that don’t belong to you, or credit lines listed with lower limits than they actually have or negative information that has stayed on the report longer than allowed. Those sorts of errors should be addressed immediately. More at Tips for Disputing Credit Report Errors

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How to Check Credit Score for Free Tips

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Ways to Check Credit Score for Free

The Fair Credit Reporting Act required consumer reporting agencies, like credit bureaus, to provide their records of you at least once ever twelve months. Since your credit report, and credit score, as so important in your financial life, it makes sense that the law mandates you are able to review it annually without cost. This is why credit experts recommend that you check your credit report at least once every twelve months for errors, omissions, or other inaccuracies so that your report is an accurate reflection of you.

There was one crucial aspect of the credit reporting system that the FCRA did not address—credit scores. When it comes to credit of any kind, whether it’s a mortgage or a new cell phone, your credit score is what creditors look at.

Oftentimes, when someone pulls your report they only get your FICO credit score. My friend is a landlord and when he pulls credit he only get their score and a few stoplight metrics like payment history and age of credit lines. He doesn’t get a full report.

It is only a matter of time before the credit score will be a required annual disclosure in conjunction with your credit report. Until then, the only way to see your credit score for free is to sign up for a credit monitoring service trial and canceling before the trial ends.

I won’t recommend any one service, they’re all pretty much the same, but I recommend one that promises to give you an official FICO credit score, not a credit bureau score. One reputable company is Fair Isaac Corporation, the originators of the FICO score, and they have a consumer facing site called myFICO (they always have plenty of myFICO promo codes flying around).

If you don’t go with Fair Isaac, choose one associated with one of the credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian, TransUnion). I don’t recommend signing up for these programs for no reason. If you are planning on getting a loan and are curious about how good your credit score is, then getting your official FICO score is important. It’s a soft inquiry so you won’t have to worry about taking a credit score hit.

If you aren’t planning on getting a loan, I wouldn’t worry about it. Checking your credit report annually is good enough and already more than what most people are doing. As long as your credit report is accurate, your score should be accurate. By checking your score prior to getting a loan, you give yourself a better idea of what your payments will likely be. More at How to Check Your Credit Score for Free

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Credit Score: All You Need to Know

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All About Credit Score

Your credit score determines your eligibility for credit cards, home loans, car loans, student loans, apartment rentals and even certain job positions. It can mean the difference between a reasonable or exorbitant interest rate, and the difference between an affordable or excruciating insurance rate. There are few, if any, 3-digit numbers that hold so much power.

Where can I find my credit score?
Once a year, federal law entitles you to a free credit report from each of the 3 major credit bureaus. If denied credit, you’re eligible for an additional report. To view your free credit report, simply go to AnnualCreditReport.com.

Unfortunately, getting a free credit score is a little more difficult and a bit more costly. You can obtain your credit score from a number of websites, but they all demand a membership fee. However, the fee generally comes with a grace period in which you can avoid paying if you cancel your account.

What is a credit score? And how is it different from a credit report?
Your credit score—also known as a FICO score—is a 3-digit number that summarizes your creditworthiness. Ranging from 300 (worst) to 850 (best), your credit score tells lenders how likely you are to pay back loans. Your primary score is determined by Fair Isaac Corporation (hence “FICO”) and is considered the most accurate assessment. The 3 major credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) also issue credit scores that vary slightly from bureau to bureau.

A credit report is an in-depth analysis of your creditworthiness issued by the credit bureaus, a detailed examination of the components that comprise your credit score. You’re entitled to a free report from each of the 3 bureaus once a year—twice if you’re rejected for credit. You should check your credit report regularly and report discrepancies immediately. Mistakes in credit reports happen more often than you might think and can have adverse effects on your credit score. You can view your free credit report (like really, truly, totally, 100% free) at AnnualCreditReport.com.

How is my credit score calculated?
Your credit score is contingent on a number of factors that can be summarized in 5 categories:

  • Payment History (35% of your FICO score): Making payments boosts your score. Missing payments destroys it. Recent history has a greater impact.
  • Amounts Owed (30% of your FICO score): Debt can hurt your score, though installment loans (like student loans) are actually beneficial if you keep up with payments. Your debt-to-credit-limit ratio is also important. Letting debt come too near your spending limit reflects poorly on your creditworthiness.
  • Length of Credit History (15% of your FICO score): The age of your accounts is taken into consideration. Old accounts earn more trust, while new accounts are regarded with suspicion.
  • New Credit (10% of your FICO score): This category looks at recent credit acquisitions and inquiries into your credit score. Too many new credit lines or too many inquiries in a short period of time look bad.
  • Types of credit used (10% of your FICO score): Different kinds of credit impact your score in different ways. The best way to score points here is to diversify your credit types.

How do I raise my credit score?
Establishing credit is easier than you might think. A good credit score starts with smart spending. More at What’s My Credit Score?

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